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The Last Days of Tarquinz
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Written and Directed by Stephen Legawiec
Developed by the Ensemble

Assistant Director: Dana Wieluns
Costumes: Robert Velasquez
Costume Assistant: Dorothy Velasquez
Lighting: Bosco Flanagan
Movement Coach/Choreographer: Dana Wieluns
Music for "The Catacombs" and the Finale
   composed by Susan Christiansen
Sound design editing: Kim Beltran
Stage Manager: Jenny Patell
Assistant Stage Manager: Jacqueline Baxter
Set Construction: Dean Purvis
Photos: Ed Krieger
 

 

 
Cast
Your guide, Olivier Riccio: Luis Zambrano
Citizens of Tarquinz:
Linda Borini, Corinda Bravo, Daniel Campagna,
Momo Casablanca, AnnaLisa Erickson, Betsy Hume, Lorin Eric Salm, Cary Thompson, Dana Wieluns
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Last Days of Tarquinz was based on the idea that a city would mysteriously disappear. Furthermore, all of the citizens of the city knew of the impending disappearance, knew the date, and that they could do nothing about it.

 

 

 
Our play consisted of what the citizens did on this last day. We decided there would be no one story, no protagonist, no continuing characters. There would be ten scenes, each in a different place, each showing a different group of people.

 

 


We chose not to dramatize any of the expected things that one might do during one’s last day on earth — the hand wringing, the communing with loved ones, the wild behavior. Certainly that did go on in this city on this day, but we chose not to show it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instead we decided to show the actions of certain people, and these people happened to be preoccupied with one thing — their identity. That is to say, “If I am to disappear without a trace, who in fact am I?”

 

 
Thus, our ten scenes featured people confronting their mirror images or their doubles, changing or concealing their identities, or straining their social masks.

 

 


We chose not to present a single tone of performance. Some scenes featured clowning, some featured mime, some drama and some dance.
 

The play also became a metaphor for theatre itself. Every performance vanishes without a trace, leaving the audience’s memory of it as its only mark.

— Stephen Legawiec

  

 

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